Is Pet Anxiety Common when Kids Go Back to School?

Pet anxiety is common when kids go back to school.Pets immersed in all manner of family summer fun may feel like the rug’s been pulled out from under them when the academic year revs up. Indeed, there’s a common slump that household animals find themselves in when there’s no one to frolic with after breakfast, no sticky hands to lick after lunch, and no one to doze with before supper. Luckily, there are things you can do to ease symptoms of pet anxiety before the school year gets underway.

Routine’s the Thing

Pets thrive when they know what to expect. They love routine so much that when it’s disrupted, even slightly, they may experience a type of despondence they’ve never known before. By the time summer is over, the family pet has probably grown accustomed to receiving lots of attention, affection, and activity. Continue…

Summer Thrills: What to do When Pet Anxiety Occurs

Pet anxiety can be caused noise, especially fireworks and thunder.When it comes to pet behavior, many owners know the exact triggers that affect their pets. It could be a siren, crying baby, or UPS truck; however, one thing is certain: a pet’s fear and stress levels can be so deeply experienced that it shakes them to their very core. It’s also not uncommon for pet anxiety to appear unexpectedly, especially if a pet is newly adopted or if a certain stimulus is very rare.

Summertime provides ample opportunities to gather and celebrate, but without a proactive approach to your pet’s emotional well-being, there could be problems facing them.

Rumble and Roar

Thunderstorm phobia is one of the leading causes of seasonal pet anxiety. Responsible for creating severe, panicked reactions in pets (like bolting away from the house or yard, relentless digging, hiding, vocalizing, and more), thunder and lightning are truly upsetting to some animals. Continue…

With Summer Pet Safety Precautions in Place, the Livin’ Is Easy

summer pet safetyWe consider ourselves pretty lucky to live in a subtropical climate. Sure, we have an occasional cold snap in the winter, but we’d be hard-pressed to hear anybody complaining about it. The other side of this coin is a scorching-hot summer. Triple-digit temperatures and high humidity have the potential to dangerously impact pets. With our summer pet safety measures, you can prevent certain health hazards far past Labor Day.

First, the Obvious

When the sun is beating down, the car is no place for a pet. Internal temperatures can reach 120-degrees in no time, leaving unattended pets at risk of heat exhaustion or heatstroke. If untreated, brain damage, organ failure, or even death can occur. Continue…